Litigation

Justice Initiative lawyers have represented scores of individuals and groups before domestic and international human rights courts and tribunals around the world. These cases seek not only to vindicate individual claims, but to establish and strengthen the law’s protection for all. 

Strategic Litigation
Filter by:
Sort by
7 litigation
Filter by
Topic
Court
Country
Sort by
Litigation

Zhao v. Netherlands

In the UN Human Rights Committee's first ever decision on the right of children to acquire nationality, it determined that by registering a child as “nationality unknown”, Dutch authorities violated his right to international protection and to seek a nationality.

Last update: December 29, 2020
Litigation

Big Brother Watch v. United Kingdom

The European Court of Human Rights held that the UK’s bulk interception regime violated the right to privacy for its lack of sufficient oversight and safeguards.

Last update: June 19, 2017
Litigation

Kasabova v. Bulgaria

The case, involving a journalist found liable for criminal libel, raised questions about the burden of proof and liability standards that ought to apply in criminal defamation proceedings.

Last update: April 19, 2011
Litigation

MGN Ltd v. United Kingdom

This case before the European Court of Human Rights involves the massive costs of libel suits, which have a chilling effect on NGOs and small publishers by discouraging them from publishing important stories.

Last update: January 18, 2011
Litigation

Sanoma Uitgevers v. the Netherlands

When an editor refused to hand over photos taken by a journalist, Dutch police tried to close the magazine down. The Open Society Justice Initiative argued that the police had violated freedom of expression.

Last update: September 14, 2010
Litigation

Sejdic and Finci v. Bosnia and Herzegovina

This case is about the right of minorities to run for political office in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Last update: December 22, 2009
Litigation

Nachova v. Bulgaria

This case involves the killing of two unarmed Roma conscripts by the Bulgarian military. The Open Society Justice Initiative argues that the incident violated the European Convention on Human Rights.

Last update: July 06, 2005

Get In Touch

Contact Us

Subscribe for Updates About Our Work

By entering your email address and clicking “Submit,” you agree to receive updates from the Open Society Justice Initiative about our work. To learn more about how we use and protect your personal data, please view our privacy policy.