Topic: International Justice

Voices

Mali: An Attack Against History and a War Crime

The destruction of tombs and museums in Timbuktu constitute war crimes, as defined by the Rome Statute. If charges follow, they would be the first of their kind before the ICC.

February 01, 2013 | Karen Corrie
Voices

Amid New Instability, a Struggle for Justice Continues in Eastern Congo

Kelly Askin has just returned from Shabouda, in the Democratic Repubic of Congo, where a mobile court continued to try rape cases, even as M23 militia attacked the provinicial town of Goma, just over 100 miles away.

November 29, 2012 | Kelly Askin
Voices

ICC Judges Demand More, Earlier from Prosecutor’s Office

Judges at the International Criminal Court are increasingly requiring prosecutors to deliver a fuller account of the facts of a case at the earliest stage of the legal process.

June 05, 2012 | Alison Cole
Voices

The Trial of Ratko Mladic: a Gender Crimes Perspective

Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb commander, is charged at the ICTY with genocide, including the use of rape and other forms as sexual violence as a means to destroy thousands of Bosnian Muslims and Bosnian Croats through "serious bodily or...

May 16, 2012 | Kelly Askin
Voices

Charles Taylor Judgment: A Victory for Gender Justice

The guilty verdict against Charles Taylor, the former president of Liberia, represents the first time that an international court has convicted a former head of state of responsibility for various forms of sexual violence.

April 26, 2012 | Kelly Askin
Voices

It Is Time for a Global Agreement on the Rule of Law

This September the "rule of law at the national and international levels" will be on the agenda at the UN General Assembly. There are sharp international differences over what that title means. But there are also important opportunities to agree...

April 19, 2012 | James A. Goldston
Voices

The Future of the European Court of Human Rights: A View from Ukraine

European governments are discussing the future of the European Court of Human Rights. For Ukraine and other post-Soviet countries, the importance of the court has never been greater.

April 17, 2012 | Halya Coynash
Voices

Case Watch: Inter-American Court to Consider Refugee Status Determinations

For the first time, the Inter-American Court will take on a case that raises the issue of a state's obligation to give proper consideration to requests for asylum and not to return a person to a country where they would be at risk of ill-treatment.

March 21, 2012 | Ben Batros
Voices

Lubanga: A Landmark Decision for International Justice

The International Criminal Court issued its first judgment today—a milestone in the path towards accountability.

March 14, 2012 | Alison Cole
Voices

Slow Progress for Gay Rights at the United Nations, Part 2

I previously expressed dismay and pessimism about the "progress" on LGBT rights at the United Nations. Unfortunately my fears were well-founded and the Human Rights Council debate on March 7 on the topic was a circus.

March 12, 2012 | Sebastian Kohn
Voices

Pictures of Atrocity: Turning Video Footage into Evidence of War Crimes

Footage being collected in Syria by smart phones and video cameras has the potential to provide documentation which could serve as critical evidence in future criminal trials.

March 07, 2012 | Alison Cole
Voices

Litany of Failure: Pressure Mounts for Education Reform in Czech Republic

Two fresh studies have again criticized the Czech Republic's failure to stop channeling Romani children into dead-end "practical" schools—which leaves them under-educated and unqualified for a job—at a rate which dwarfs their non-Romani classmates.

March 06, 2012 | Tracey Gurd
Voices

Britain’s Debate over National Security and the Public’s Right to Know

Britain’s debate over the use of classified intelligence material in court highlights the need to set an appropriate and transparent balance between what may legitimately be held in secret, and the public’s right to know.

March 02, 2012 | Emi MacLean
Voices

Corporate Accountability Comes before the U.S. Supreme Court

Esther Kiobel and 11 other Nigerian citizens say Shell shares responsibility for abuses they suffered in Nigeria's Ogoni region in the 1990s. The Supreme Court is now deciding whether a federal court in the U.S. can hear their human rights claims...

March 01, 2012 | Erica Razook
Voices

Case Watch: European Ruling Affirms the Rights of Migrants at Sea

By requiring states to guarantee human rights beyond their state´s territorial boundaries, Europe´s human rights court has upheld the primacy of fundamental rights and the rule of law.

February 27, 2012 | Simon Cox
Voices

Case Watch: East Africa's Fledgling Court Feels its Way

The evolution of the case load of the East African Court of Justice also reminds us that those who seek to promote human rights through the legal process must sometimes look beyond traditional forums in order to seek justice.

February 27, 2012 | Ben Batros
Voices

A Long Walk to Justice for Rape in Eastern Congo Demands Support

A mobile court trained to handle rape cases in Eastern Congo is raising expectations among local people. But international donors must ensure that this vital project doesn't expire for lack of support next year.

February 24, 2012 | Kelly Askin
Voices

Pretrial Abuses Dominate at the European Court of Human Rights

Cases involving pretrial rights abuses made up more than two-thirds of judgments issued by the European Court of Human Rights over the past three months, with most of the cases originating in Russia, Ukraine and Turkey.

February 22, 2012 | Marina Ilminska
Voices

Italy’s Migrant Interception Faces European Court Scrutiny

The European Court of Human Rights will rule on Thursday on the case of Somali and Eritrean migrants who were sent back to Libya in 2009 after being intercepted in the Mediterranean by Italian Customs and Coastguard vessels.

February 21, 2012 | Costanza Hermanin
Voices

Slow Progress for Gay Rights at the United Nations

LGBTI people continue to be murdered, raped, and harassed—sometimes by the government that is supposed to protect them—while the UN is unable to unanimously decide whether these crimes actually violate human rights at all.

February 21, 2012 | Sebastian Kohn
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